Can she be, who she can’t see? -WIE ILC2 2021

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Speaker: Dr. Salma M.S. Alarefi, University of Leeds

In the U.K. the number of women in STEM education and career remains modest despite of wide-scale initiatives devoted to promoting interest and accelerating recognition. Whereas, sustained effort continues to contribute to promising outcomes of the former, the latter, i.e., acceleration through sustainable development, is yet to be prioritized. Unarguably, this is an inevitable fertiliser for inequality. That necessitates the need for a sustainable approach to the matter, whereby the development starts at the stimulation of interest, sustained throughout the life cycle of a women in engineering career and tailored to cater her needs. Indeed, the impact on the minority of minorities is exacerbated. This is alarming considering that in the U.K. women from Black and Asian Minority Ethnic BAME backgrounds make up less than 10% of the female engineering students’ population, and less than 1% of executive board members in top 500 engineering firms. The key factor that continue to challenge engineering women’s progression, BAME women in particular, is the lack of role models. That will remain to be, unless women leadership is accelerated through a sustainable development. This presentation thus, addresses the challenges that limits the progression of BAME women engineers into leadership and highlights opportunities for accelerations

Speaker: Dr. Salma M.S. Alarefi, University of Leeds

In the U.K. the number of women in STEM education and career remains modest despite of wide-scale initiatives devoted to promoting interest and accelerating recognition. Whereas, sustained effort continues to contribute to promising outcomes of the former, the latter, i.e., acceleration through sustainable development, is yet to be prioritized...

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