Gender-Based Occupational Stereotypes: New Behaviors, Old Attitudes - Carolyn Matheus & Elizabeth Quinn - IEEE WIE Forum USA East 2017

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This presentation was recorded at the IEEE Women in Engineering East Forum on 2 December 2017. 

Abstract: Gender role stereotypes stem from ingrained cultural and social attitudes toward traditionally masculine and feminine roles. People judge whether certain occupations are more suitable for men or for women based on occupational stereotypes of what a job requires and gender stereotypes regarding characteristics perceived to be gender-specific. This study used implicit and explicit measures to empirically examine stereotypical judgments about the perceived masculinity and femininity of engineers, elementary school teachers, accountants, law enforcement officers, and fashion designers. Results indicate the presence of gender-based stereotypes, and gender and age were found to be significant predictors. Workplace implications are discussed in an effort to understand why such stereotypes continue to influence career selection, hiring and promotion practices, and performance evaluations despite numerous efforts to promote gender equality in the workplace.

Dr. Carolyn C. Matheus is an Associate Professor of Information Systems at Marist College. She holds a PhD in Organizational Studies with an emphasis on leadership and work motivation from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany. She teaches undergraduate courses in information technology and systems with a focus on information quality and human computer interaction, as well as graduate courses with a focus on data analytics and C-level leadership in technology organizations. Her undergraduate and graduate coursework mirror her research streams, with a focus on designing computer systems for a diverse user base and leveraging
technology for interdisciplinary applications.

Dr. Matheus’ research has been published in a number of prestigious journals, including the ACM Journal of Data and Information Quality and Communications of the Association for Information Systems. She has participated as a reviewer for the IEEE Access Journal as well as the ACM and IEEE Computer Society curricular report joint initiative IT2017: Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Degree Programs in Information Technology.

Dr. Matheus is committed to fostering student engagement through active learning, both inside and outside of the classroom. She provides mentorship opportunities through faculty-student research projects, which have led to numerous publications in journals and proceedings, and has presented research with students at domestic and international conferences. She co-leads an annual service learning program in which students majoring in Computer Science/Information Technology and Systems (CS/ITS) collaborate with Spanish students to host a technology
summer camp for elementary and junior-high students in the Dominican Republic.

Dr. Matheus is involved in many areas of campus life. She serves as an internship coordinator, assisting CS/ITS students with building their resumes and developing interviewing skills, as well as initiating and maintaining relationships with alumni and companies who provide internships and jobs to students. She offers a seminar on authentic leadership for the Emerging Leaders Program to help students explore their leadership style and develop leadership skills. She also participates with industry, academic, and community initiatives aimed at increasing the representation of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) majors and occupations.

Elizabeth Quinn, PhD., LMHC, is an Associate Professor of Psychology and serves as Chair of  Faculty Affairs at Marist College. Dr. Quinn teaches in the undergraduate Psychology Program as well in the graduate Mental Health Counseling and School Psychology Programs. She has co-authored several books including Empowering students: A contemporary philosophy of education (2014), Treating young veterans: Promoting resilience through practice and advocacy (2011), The community mental health system: A navigational guide for providers (2007), and Community psychology: A common sense approach to mental health (2005). She has also presented and published in the areas of stress management for leaders, the psychology of women, and the use of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of substance abuse. She maintains a private psychotherapy practice working with women struggling with anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders.

This presentation was recorded at the IEEE Women in Engineering East Forum on 2 December 2017. 

Abstract: Gender role stereotypes stem from ingrained cultural and social attitudes toward traditionally masculine and feminine roles. People judge whether certain occupations are more suitable for men or for women based on occupational stereotypes of what a job requires and gender stereotypes regarding characteristics perceived to be...

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