2019 ComSoc Autumn School

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  • Applying Artificial Intelligence in Network Operators

    00:46:21
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    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a widely used technique that basically describes the capability to simulate or imitate the human reasoning as intelligent behavioral. It has been applied to several areas and they can help to solve problems in the networking area. SDN (Software-Defined Networking) is a technology that enables automation in network, but to take some actions, we need data from the network elements. Current solutions for real time information retrieval, used for various network management purposes service’s performance monitoring, network reconciliation or assurance are based on polling, strategy which may be suboptimal in some cases. Polling incurs significant latency, both because the event might occur at any moment in between of the client polling period and because the device introduces some delay during the system request processing. This latency precludes many real-time of applications which relay on instant information arrival to operate under this mechanism, which may even saturate the Data Communication Network (DCN) network when the amount of another scenario is that of applications that track datastore configuration changes through notifications. To get the event, many remote polling cycles are done without any change detected and wasting resources in the network, devices, and applications. This is clear in scenarios where the changes occur only infrequently. Telemetry is a technology to enable artificial intelligence in network operator scenarios.

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  • Software Defined Networking for Network Operators Part 1

    00:45:34
    7 views

    Service providers are in a continuous evolution in order to satisfy the changing and variable service demand of the end users. This affects not only to the service offering but also to the network supporting the delivery of such services. A key part of it is the transport infrastructure. Network operations are heavily influenced by the control and management capabilities available. The paradigm of Software Defined Networking (SDN) becomes the central point of network evolution, covering the majority of existing gaps. Key aspects of operations such as network provisioning or troubleshooting can then benefit from advanced tools and mechanisms. Software Defined Networking (SDN) originally entailed the decoupling of control and forwarding planes in the network elements, with the deployment of a centralized controller with the complete network view, running intelligent algorithms and applications (either as part of the controller or on top of it) and instructing the nodes accordingly. This original view, when ported to real carrier networks, has been evolved slightly towards an architecture where the centralized control assists the network elements on the forwarding tasks, providing single and unified control environment for network operations and at the same time optimizing the usage of network assets. The network elements yet retain control capabilities (in some cases alleviating some signaling tasks) but leveraging on the centralized controller for end-to-end and cross-layer actions through programmable interfaces. This session presents a realistic SDN approach towards and standards-based architecture for softwarized network operation.

  • Software Defined Networking for Network Operators Part 2

    00:26:45
    2 views

    Service providers are in a continuous evolution in order to satisfy the changing and variable service demand of the end users. This affects not only to the service offering but also to the network supporting the delivery of such services. A key part of it is the transport infrastructure. Network operations are heavily influenced by the control and management capabilities available. The paradigm of Software Defined Networking (SDN) becomes the central point of network evolution, covering the majority of existing gaps. Key aspects of operations such as network provisioning or troubleshooting can then benefit from advanced tools and mechanisms. Software Defined Networking (SDN) originally entailed the decoupling of control and forwarding planes in the network elements, with the deployment of a centralized controller with the complete network view, running intelligent algorithms and applications (either as part of the controller or on top of it) and instructing the nodes accordingly. This original view, when ported to real carrier networks, has been evolved slightly towards an architecture where the centralized control assists the network elements on the forwarding tasks, providing single and unified control environment for network operations and at the same time optimizing the usage of network assets. The network elements yet retain control capabilities (in some cases alleviating some signaling tasks) but leveraging on the centralized controller for end-to-end and cross-layer actions through programmable interfaces. This session presents a realistic SDN approach towards and standards-based architecture for softwarized network operation.

  • Software Defined Networking for Network Operators Part 3

    01:21:55
    2 views

    Service providers are in a continuous evolution in order to satisfy the changing and variable service demand of the end users. This affects not only to the service offering but also to the network supporting the delivery of such services. A key part of it is the transport infrastructure. Network operations are heavily influenced by the control and management capabilities available. The paradigm of Software Defined Networking (SDN) becomes the central point of network evolution, covering the majority of existing gaps. Key aspects of operations such as network provisioning or troubleshooting can then benefit from advanced tools and mechanisms. Software Defined Networking (SDN) originally entailed the decoupling of control and forwarding planes in the network elements, with the deployment of a centralized controller with the complete network view, running intelligent algorithms and applications (either as part of the controller or on top of it) and instructing the nodes accordingly. This original view, when ported to real carrier networks, has been evolved slightly towards an architecture where the centralized control assists the network elements on the forwarding tasks, providing single and unified control environment for network operations and at the same time optimizing the usage of network assets. The network elements yet retain control capabilities (in some cases alleviating some signaling tasks) but leveraging on the centralized controller for end-to-end and cross-layer actions through programmable interfaces. This session presents a realistic SDN approach towards and standards-based architecture for softwarized network operation.

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  • An Intelligent End-to-end Network Slicing Orchestration for Verticals Industries

    01:30:41
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    This talk explores why virtualization is so important and how network operators and virtualization groups address this topic, and then see how we can move from the virtualization concept to network slicing. The lecture begins with network virtualization concepts and a historical overview of virtualization and the need for network sharing. Next is the passive sharing of radio equipment, active network sharing multi tenancy to support 5G networks. The 5G business model and the standard efforts towards network slicing and network slicing in emerging 5G systems is then discussed. Network slicing in radio access networks, end-to-end network slicing orchestration and slicing enabled network scenarios such as IoT deployments and edge computing environment is also examined.

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  • Wireless Solutions for Industry Verticals Part 1

    01:27:19
    4 views

    This presentation highlights the role of 5G in the factory of the future. It consists of two parts: the first part targets a lay audience and provides general information on industrial Internet of Things, with focus on the associated values and business requirements. The technology enablers for such unification between the worlds of telecommunications and industrial automation are put forward, highlighting the role of network slicing. The second part touches more technical aspects of industrial 5G deployments, and discusses solutions offering increased levels of reliability at the radio access domain, as well as network function availability. Emphasis is put on the data duplication approach, showing an analysis on the achievable reduction on packet drops in various load scenarios. The presentation closes with an overview of positioning (localization) approaches, underlining the advances of 5G positioning to predecessor technologies and their potential to meet the stringent industrial requirements.

  • Wireless Solutions for Industry Verticals Part 2

    01:14:08
    2 views

    This presentation highlights the role of 5G in the factory of the future. It consists of two parts: the first part targets a lay audience and provides general information on industrial Internet of Things, with focus on the associated values and business requirements. The technology enablers for such unification between the worlds of telecommunications and industrial automation are put forward, highlighting the role of network slicing. The second part touches more technical aspects of industrial 5G deployments, and discusses solutions offering increased levels of reliability at the radio access domain, as well as network function availability. Emphasis is put on the data duplication approach, showing an analysis on the achievable reduction on packet drops in various load scenarios. The presentation closes with an overview of positioning (localization) approaches, underlining the advances of 5G positioning to predecessor technologies and their potential to meet the stringent industrial requirements.

  • IEEE MemberUS $4.99
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  • Software Defined Networks and Network Function Virtualization: Theory and Practice Part 1

    01:21:52
    4 views

    This tutorial is intended to teach the basics of Software Defined Networking and Network Function Virtualization by providing both theoretical concepts as well as
    hands-on experience. By merging theory with practice, the audience will be able to understand the concepts and possibilities of these two emerging communication
    paradigms. In the first part of the tutorial, Software Defined Networking will be introduced as a novel paradigm for controlling network infrastructures and then
    implemented by using the OpenFlow protocol and related controllers. By using a proper Virtual Machine running mininet emulation software, the audience will be
    able to implement a simple SDN network based on OpenFlow and analyze its behaviour. In the second part of the tutorial, NFV and the MANO architecture will be
    introduced, and the audience will have the chance to experiment with such technology by using docker to deploy available services and also design new ones.

  • Software Defined Networks and Network Function Virtualization: Theory and Practice Part 2

    01:23:43
    2 views

    This tutorial is intended to teach the basics of Software Defined Networking and Network Function Virtualization by providing both theoretical concepts as well as
    hands-on experience. By merging theory with practice, the audience will be able to understand the concepts and possibilities of these two emerging communication
    paradigms. In the first part of the tutorial, Software Defined Networking will be introduced as a novel paradigm for controlling network infrastructures and then
    implemented by using the OpenFlow protocol and related controllers. By using a proper Virtual Machine running mininet emulation software, the audience will be
    able to implement a simple SDN network based on OpenFlow and analyze its behaviour. In the second part of the tutorial, NFV and the MANO architecture will be
    introduced, and the audience will have the chance to experiment with such technology by using docker to deploy available services and also design new ones.

  • IEEE MemberUS $4.99
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  • "Algorithmic Nuggets in Network Slicing and Resource Allocation" Part 1

    01:05:29
    6 views

    This tutorial gives an overview of problems, models and algorithmic techniques.
    arising in the context network slicing, with a focus on resource allocation and optimization,
    but also including an excursion to security aspects.
    In particular, we will cover network virtualization and virtual network embedding problems,
    routing via waypoints and traffic engineering, and algorithms for local fast failover.
     

  • "Algorithmic Nuggets in Network Slicing and Resource Allocation" Part 2

    01:21:55
    2 views

    This tutorial gives an overview of problems, models and algorithmic techniques.
    arising in the context network slicing, with a focus on resource allocation and optimization,
    but also including an excursion to security aspects.
    In particular, we will cover network virtualization and virtual network embedding problems,
    routing via waypoints and traffic engineering, and algorithms for local fast failover.